I first connected Andy Storch, author of Own Your Life Own Your Career, back in April of 2018, in a Facebook Group! Andy was writing about freelancing and debt, a topic I super intrigued with at the time. I reached out to Andy and we hit it off right away.

Quickly, we even scheduled an appearance on The Hobby Hustler Show! We talked about “How To Live Up To Your True Potential”.

Since then, we’ve talked here and there, but mostly, I’ve been following his journey of success.

When he came out with his book, Own Your Life Own Your Career, it was a no brainer to buy.

After reading the book, you’d never know Andy was a podcaster before a writer, damn he can write!

Onto the book review…

Andy starts off by sharing his story and puts emphases on the parts where he wasn’t perfect. In his 20’s he did drift and was not laser focused, similar to most people, like myself too.

He mentions that most people start their career by accident, which is exactly what happened to me. You know how it happens, someone mentions something to you about a job or a course, and then one thing leads to another and suddenly 5 years go by and you’re in the same role, doing the same thing, just drifting through your life.

Owning your career and life means to take leadership and responsibility for your actions and future. It starts from your vision and what you want, to a concrete plan and the goals that you need to get there. 

One of my favourite aspects of the book is that whether you are an entrepreneur working on your own business, or still working a 9 to 5, this book is relatable to you.

Having a Mindset of Growth and Openness

This is a overlaying theme that occurs throughout the whole book. It is all about having a plan and sticking with the plan, while at the same time, understanding that you can change it and pivot when needed.

Andy does a great job explaining that challenges and success’ will arise on your journey and you have to roll with the punches by changing and adapting yourself. Don’t have a victim mindset, but rather a growth mindset.

Embrace what is to come.

The subtitle, “Stop Drifting and Take Control of Your Future” is so pertinent because I have not always been focused in my career or in my business, and Andy always stresses the future, not the past. By taking this approach, he doesn’t make you feel guilty of “where you could of” or “should of” or “would of” been if you just did X, Y or Z.

Chances are, you may face some failure at your career or in your business, and it may not be because you failed. Did your employer set you up for failure by giving you a task that wasn’t right for you from the beginning? Or maybe you were not clear with them on with what you want and what you should be doing. Regardless, when this failure comes, do not curl up in a little ball and go about it negatively. Don’t let it define you and stop you from pursuing your goals, or maybe even that raise.

If it crushes your confidence, your employer will see that and recognize it as a weakness.

Take failure positively and figure out how you could’ve done it better. Communicate it with the higher-ups.

Goal Setting

Goal setting is important in your path to owning your life because if you always have the moon as your success, you’re going to feel down and depressed eventually, thinking that your moonshot is too far.

When you break things into goals, you will have mini-victories along the way, which also aim to keep your morale up.

I’ve actually set a few goals at my day job and now it’s becoming a talking point in the lunchroom. Encouraging others to set goals created a culture of achievement, rather than “how can we waste another 30 minutes and get paid”.

Be Proactive Not Reactive

My favourite theme in the book is to be proactive, not reactive. It’s my favourite because my boss uses it all the time at work and it is a common saying at our workplace. We even have signs posted in the lunch room!

Have an idea? Tell someone.

Waiting for a task? Ask someone.

Not sure about a process? Create your own and try it.

Don’t let things happen to you, in other words. Make things happen on your terms.

By adapting a mindset of proactivivity, you are enabling yourself to control your vision and tasks.

When you have a meeting with your boss, it will be much easier to ask for a raise after demonstrating all the initiatives you started rather than everything they had to tell you.

Your manager does not want to micromanage you, but they feel like they have too!

Knowing What You Want By Creating Your Ideal Lifestyle

I’ve talked about a similar topic on the blog, and that reaffirms to me how important it is to reverse engineer your lifestyle.

Ask yourself:

Do I want to work 70 hours/week, travel for business, and spend little time with family, but make a boatload of money?

Do I want to work 40 hours/week, be home by 5:30 PM every day, and make less money?

Do I want to work 24/7, have my own business or have a partnership with someone?

It is okay if it changes too!

Andy mentions in the book how he has changed his lifestyle design goals through different points in his career. He switched from being an aspiring executive with the titles to being happy and wanting to spend more time with his family, even if it meant no titles and less money.

Chapter Summaries

Kudos to you Andy for doing this. I think authors should take a page out your book and do this too.

At the end of every chapter, Andy wrote a little paragraph summarizing the chapter and the key takeaways.

Here is an example (Chapter 2 Summary)

“Knowing your purpose and being able to connect it to your work and your company’s values and purpose is important, yet most people don’t know theirs. They go through life drifting and unsure why they are doing things.

You can improve…you will have to buy the book to read the rest!

 

Congratulations Andy on this amazing book! There are so many pieces of wisdom that are going to change people’s lives.

If you are feeling stuck or feel like you are drifting in your life, stop waiting for someone and start taking control of your life.